LAC ‘DPhil Network’

Doctoral Studies at Oxford

The School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies offers a DPhil in Area Studies for students that aim to explore a broad range of area-specific issues in Latin America (and other regions of the World).  The School’s DPhil (the name given to the PhD degree at the University of Oxford) is a full-time three year programme of doctoral study, offering the opportunity to undertake a project dedicated to researching a specific country, a particular region, or else to examining more than one country or region in a comparative context, using social science approaches whilst also generating theories and propositions that are of value across regions. More information about the DPhil in Area Studies may be consulted here.

Moreover, students can study for doctorates with a Latin American theme or focus under the aegis of other discipline departments including History, Politics & International Relations, Economics, Sociology, Modern Languages (Literature), Development Studies and Anthropology.

Please see the Theses and Dissertations in Latin American Studies document for a list of past Oxford theses submitted on Latin American topics.

 

Latin American Centre DPhil Seminar

All doctoral students at Oxford are eligible to join the LAC DPhil Seminar. It is a group of DPhils from across all social science departments and related disciplines in the humanities departments at the University of Oxford who share one common interest: Research on Latin America.

The seminar is a student-led project supported by the LAC and it is a space where Oxford's DPhil and Doctoral Visiting students come together to present their papers or thesis chapters and receive constructive feedback from colleagues, professors, fellows or visiting academics. The group meets at least once per term at the LAC.

The seminar is a great opportunity for DPhils when they are preparing for the transfer of status, confirmation or final viva; not to mention very helpful when preparing a paper for journal submission. Moreover, the seminar is also a common and flexible space, where students are able to meet peers working on Latin America’s main challenges. 

 

The next Latin American DPhil Seminar will take place on Friday of Week 2 (October 21 2016) at the Latin American Centre between 2:00pm and 5:00pm

The seminar will be chaired by Professor Eduardo Posada-Carbó and will host three presentations:

2:00 – 2:15 pm: Welcome by prof. Eduardo Posada-Carbó

2:15pm – 2:35pm: Panelist 1 – Juan David Gutiérrez-Rodríguez (DPhil student at the Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford), “The political economy of managing oil revenues in Colombian municipalities: A case study of Arauca".

2:35– 2:45pm: Discussant: prof. Eduardo Posada-Carbó

2:45pm – 3:05 pm: Q&A 

3:05pm – 3:25pm: Panelist 2 – Jonas von Hoffmann (DPhil student at the Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford), “The Politics of Cannabis Policy Reform in Latin America“. 

3:25pm – 3:35pm: Discussant: prof. David Doyle

3:35pm – 3:55 pm: Q&A 

3:55 pm – 4:15pm: Panelist 3 – Ivor Jones (LSE), “Open or Closed? The Politics of Software Licensing in Argentina and Brazil”.

4:15pm – 4:25 pm: Discussant: prof. Diego Sanchez-Anochea

4:25pm – 4:45 pm: Q&A 

4:45pm – 5:00 pm: Closing remarks by Juan David Gutiérrez-Rodríguez.

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm: Latin Americanist DPhil students reception at LAC

 

If you are interested in presenting your paper or thesis chapter in future seminar sessions please contact juan.gutierrezrodriguez@bsg.ox.ac.uk.

We hope to see many of you there!

 

Previous seminars have included the following presentations:

  • Gabriela Martínez-Sainz: "Teaching human rights in Mexico? The challenges of translating international policies into teaching practices".
  • Juan D. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez: "Political, institutional and economic challenges of investing royalties in Colombia".
  • Hayley Jones: “Young People’s Schooling Trajectories and Social Transitions in Brazil’s Bolsa Família Program”.
  • Simon Escoffier: "Mobilisational Citizenship: Identity and Collective Action in Santiago de Chile’s Poblaciones".
  • Laura Bernal-Bermúdez: "Urapalma S.A.: a criminal enterprise and strategic alliances. Forced displacement and land dispossession of the Afro-Colombian communities of Curvaradó and Jiguamiandó (Chocó)".
  • Tomás Quesada-Alpízar: "Constitutional Empowerment in Costa Rica, Chile and Uruguay, 1990-2015. Initial findings on Costa Rica".
  • Andrés Palacios Lleras: " The Making of Antitrust 'Common Sense': Chile 1990 - 2014".
  • Arturo Ibáñez-León: "Ownership and protection against non-dispossessory interferences with land in Chilean law: a critical analysis in light of comparative law".
  • Pedro R. Fortes: “Collective Action for consumer protection: the Brazilian experience'”.
  • Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira: “Towards a distributive justice framework in urban transportation in Latin America”.
  • Sebastián Castro: “The role of judicial actors in the development of economic telecommunications regulation in Chile”.
  • Anna Krausova: “Demands, political opportunities and protest outcomes: Indigenous protest events in 13 Latin American countries”.
  • Anneloes Hoff: “Legal mobilisation and the judicialisation of mining resistance: The case of Colombia’s consultas populares”.
  • Julia Zulver: “High Risk Feminism in Violent Contexts: Women’s Mobilisation in Latin America”.
  • Marcos Calo Medina: “We Meet and Mingle Together Separately:” An Ethnographic Examination of Tseltal and Ladino Catholicism in Chilón, Chiapas (Mexico)”.





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